POTTERY OF THE SOUTHWEST

Artists and Pieces from Southwestern Pottery - Anasazi to Zuni

Picuris Pueblo

You can't appreciate Picuris Pueblo Pottery or proper southwestern cooking until you’ve eaten beans cooked in a Picuris pot.

Traditional Name: “Pe’ewi”. Picuris Pueblo, nestled in the Sangre de Christo Mountains is one of the most remote Pueblos located in North Central New Mexico. It was established around 1250 AD by the migrating Tewa speaking people. At it’s height, Picuris had over 3000 inhabitants.

Picuris and Taos pottery is very different from other pueblo pottery featuring micaceous clay with metallic gold flecks. Picuris potters made utilitarian ware up until recently when tourist and collectors started noticing. The pots are unpainted, thin walled pottery which highlight the beautiful forms decorated with sculptural features, impressions, incised motifs and applique details.

“Wherever it’s from, micaceous clay can make pieces strong and safe enough for cooking, and for much of it, that was it’s main purpose. It is said that you can’t really appreciate southwestern pottery or proper southwestern cooking until you’ve eaten beans cooked in a Picuris pot.” – Southwestern Pottery Anasazi to Zuni, Second Edition, Revised and Expanded by Allen Hayes and John Blom, 2015.

Picuris 1902 - Anthony Durand - Polished Gold Micaceous Bean Pot with Lid

Polished Gold Micaceous Bean Pot with Lid

Anthony Durand Details